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#1 2013-02-17 08:22:13

bericp1
Member
Registered: 2013-02-17
Posts: 17

Installing Arch on a new Windows 8 Machine

Hey Guys,

So I've ordered a new laptop (Dell Inspiron 15z w/ i7+8GB+Nvidia+non-touch) and it'll get here Wednesday and I'm not particularly excited to use windows 8. I kinda liked it on the touch all-in-one I have but its flat out horrendous to use with a mouse. Anyways, that's a discussion for another forum. What I was wondering is what do I need to look out for when I setup dual-boot with arch on this new laptop. I'm nearly positive it'll be a UEFI motherboard because I'm pretty sure I was told that all machines that ship win Windows 8 are, but I could be mistaken.

I'm vaguely familiar with how UEFI works in place of BIOS but I was slightly confused as to what the least bug ridden and most future-proof way of dual booting Win8+arch on UEFI. If someone could lend me a suggestion or two on what will be the least head-ache-inducing, that would be awesome.

Also, what else do I need to look out for when it comes to dual-booting Win8+arch hardware-wise or software-wise? USB3 stuff maybe? I'm no stranger to linux or dual-booting, just concerned about Win8-specific hardware problems I might have with arch. My current arch dual boot is with windows 7 without UEFI, USB3, bluetooth, or HDMI so I don't know if any of this will cause problems with arch on this laptop when I get it.

If it helps, the service page for it is here.

Thanks in advance

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#2 2013-02-17 12:14:07

bernarcher
Forum Fellow
From: Germany
Registered: 2009-02-17
Posts: 2,273

Re: Installing Arch on a new Windows 8 Machine

Moving to Newbie Corner.


To know or not to know ...
... the questions remain forever.

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#3 2013-02-17 17:57:48

hal8000
Member
Registered: 2011-05-20
Posts: 45

Re: Installing Arch on a new Windows 8 Machine

Theres a Wiki page here about UEFI

https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Un … _Interface


You might also need a GUID partition table

https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/GU … tion_Table

if the harddisk is larger than 2TB

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#4 2013-02-18 05:21:41

hunterthomson
Member
Registered: 2008-06-22
Posts: 794
Website

Re: Installing Arch on a new Windows 8 Machine

If there is no way to disable Secure Boot then you will have to deal with that.
The Linux Foundation has a signed UEFi bootloader that you can use with Secure Boot.

http://blog.hansenpartnership.com/linux … -released/


OpenBSD-current Thinkpad X230, i7-3520M, 16GB CL9 Kingston, Samsung 830 256GB
Contributor: linux-grsec

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#5 2013-02-18 06:30:57

jasonwryan
Forum & Wiki Admin
From: .nz
Registered: 2009-05-09
Posts: 19,329
Website

Re: Installing Arch on a new Windows 8 Machine

Windows 8 machines ship with secure boot enabled, but you have the option of disabling it. The shim is only if you want to boot a signed GNU/Linux image.


Arch + dwm   •   Mercurial repos  •   Github

Registered Linux User #482438

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#6 2013-02-18 16:33:28

srs5694
Member
From: Woonsocket, RI
Registered: 2012-11-06
Posts: 719
Website

Re: Installing Arch on a new Windows 8 Machine

jasonwryan wrote:

Windows 8 machines ship with secure boot enabled, but you have the option of disabling it. The shim is only if you want to boot a signed GNU/Linux image.

More precisely, shim and the LF's PreBootloader are required to launch a signed Linux boot loader or boot manager with Secure Boot enabled. If you sign ELILO or a stock version of GRUB, they'll launch an unsigned Linux kernel just fine. Also, using a signed Linux kernel will, by itself, get you only so far in security terms, since it will load unsigned kernel modules unless the kernel itself is modified. (Fedora's doing a lot of work to make Secure Boot have a real impact within Linux, but AFAIK they're the only ones using this as of yet.)

For an Arch user, the real question isn't whether you want to boot a signed Linux boot loader or kernel; it's whether you want to boot Windows with Secure Boot active. Doing so has theoretical (but strong) security benefits. Since switching Secure Boot on and off with each boot is a nuisance, using shim or PreBootloader in Linux on a system that boots Windows with Secure Boot active makes sense. At the moment, the LF's PreBootloader is likely to be easier to install and use with Arch than Fedora's shim.

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