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#26 2012-10-29 15:37:43

ajaxas
Member
Registered: 2009-02-23
Posts: 65
Website

Re: systemd -- remove user from certain groups?

A week old pure systemd setup on a laptop powered by a year-old archlinux installation.

As per instructions here I just removed my user from any unnecessary groups, et voilà:

[ajaxas@r2d2 ~]$ id
uid=1000(ajaxas) gid=100(users) groups=100(users),3(sys),4(adm),10(wheel),19(log),90(network)

Everything works fine, at least video/audio, and a usb stick got detected all right. Don't have printers.

Btw, do I still need a systemd-sysvcompat package with pure systemd, or is it for a mixed setup only?

Thanks!

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#27 2012-10-29 15:41:16

ataraxia
Member
From: Pittsburgh
Registered: 2007-05-06
Posts: 1,537

Re: systemd -- remove user from certain groups?

systemd-sysvcompat is what makes for a pure systemd setup, as it's what forces the removal of sysvinit.

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#28 2012-10-29 16:23:11

loafer
Member
From: the pub
Registered: 2009-04-14
Posts: 1,693

Re: systemd -- remove user from certain groups?

systemd-sysvcompat simply provides symlinks for commands like init, shutdown, reboot, halt.  It isn't actually required by systemd.


All men have stood for freedom...
For freedom is the man that will turn the world upside down.
Gerrard Winstanley.

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#29 2012-10-29 16:26:40

ajaxas
Member
Registered: 2009-02-23
Posts: 65
Website

Re: systemd -- remove user from certain groups?

ataraxia wrote:

systemd-sysvcompat is what makes for a pure systemd setup, as it's what forces the removal of sysvinit.

Um, well, doesn't it sound a little bit controversial? Just think: a System V compatibility package that creates symlinks to systemd in place of System V files makes a pure systemd setup?

That's cool! smile

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#30 2012-10-29 16:28:52

ajaxas
Member
Registered: 2009-02-23
Posts: 65
Website

Re: systemd -- remove user from certain groups?

loafer wrote:

systemd-sysvcompat simply provides symlinks for commands like init, shutdown, reboot, halt.  It isn't actually required by systemd.

So, is it safe to remove? 'Cause pacman -R systemd-sysvcompat doesn't tell about any broken dependencies.

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#31 2012-10-29 16:29:48

Scimmia
Bug Wrangler
Registered: 2012-09-01
Posts: 4,993

Re: systemd -- remove user from certain groups?

No. If you're booting with systemd, leave systemd-sysvcompat alone. A lot of stuff still uses the old commands, and they would stop working without those symlinks. It also provides the init symlink so that you don't have to have an init= line in your bootloader.

Last edited by Scimmia (2012-10-29 16:32:23)

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#32 2012-10-29 16:38:09

ajaxas
Member
Registered: 2009-02-23
Posts: 65
Website

Re: systemd -- remove user from certain groups?

@Scimmia

OK, thank you. Although I do hope for a day when grub will be able to load systemd directly.

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#33 2012-10-29 16:46:14

Scimmia
Bug Wrangler
Registered: 2012-09-01
Posts: 4,993

Re: systemd -- remove user from certain groups?

It has nothing to do with grub, really. The kernel runs /sbin/init unless you tell it otherwise with an init=/xx/xx/xx parameter. The only reason grub enters into the conversation is because that's where you can change the kernel parameters, but the kernel is what would have to change.

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#34 2012-10-29 22:26:17

WonderWoofy
Member
From: Los Gatos, CA
Registered: 2012-05-19
Posts: 8,412

Re: systemd -- remove user from certain groups?

So earlier in the thread, I was talking about framebuffer access when not in the 'video' group.  I reached out to [arch-general] to get input from the higher powers.  Tomegun responded and what I ended up with in the end is making the file /etc/udev/rules/71-my-uaccess.rules which includes the following:

%  cat /etc/udev/rules.d/71-uaccess.rules
## Additional uaccess tags that are not included /w systemd defaults

ACTION=="remove", GOTO="uaccess_end"
ENV{MAJOR}=="", GOTO="uaccess_end"

# framebuffer
SUBSYSTEM=="graphics", KERNEL=="fb*", TAG+="uaccess"

LABEL="uaccess_end"

So just in case there are any other users out there who do work outside of X and need framebuffer access.  In case you didn't read the entire thread, this came about as a result of my desire to be able to use mplayer in the framebuffer without issuing the command as root.

I hope this might help some of you out there!

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#35 2012-10-29 22:40:31

cfr
Member
From: Cymru
Registered: 2011-11-27
Posts: 5,662

Re: systemd -- remove user from certain groups?

Re. the earlier issue about the power group.

I removed myself from the power group and logged out and back in. systemctl suspend works fine from the command line. However, KDE now allows me to suspend as well. So I'm really confused. Is this because I didn't reboot? Or has something else changed?


How To Ask Questions The Smart Way | Help Vampires

Arch Linux | x86_64 | GPT | EFI boot | grub2 | systemd | LVM2 on LUKS
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#36 2012-10-29 23:51:11

WonderWoofy
Member
From: Los Gatos, CA
Registered: 2012-05-19
Posts: 8,412

Re: systemd -- remove user from certain groups?

That is rather funky as well.  I guess you should just be happy it is working now...

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#37 2012-10-30 01:26:19

Antoine
Member
From: Picton Ontario
Registered: 2012-10-11
Posts: 90

Re: systemd -- remove user from certain groups?

Scimmia wrote:

It has nothing to do with grub, really. The kernel runs /sbin/init unless you tell it otherwise with an init=/xx/xx/xx parameter. The only reason grub enters into the conversation is because that's where you can change the kernel parameters, but the kernel is what would have to change.

/sbin/init is a symlink to /usr/lib/systemd/systemd:

[disney ~]$ file /sbin/init
/sbin/init: symbolic link to `../usr/lib/systemd/systemd'

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#38 2012-10-30 11:37:28

ajaxas
Member
Registered: 2009-02-23
Posts: 65
Website

Re: systemd -- remove user from certain groups?

Scimmia wrote:

It has nothing to do with grub, really. The kernel runs /sbin/init unless you tell it otherwise with an init=/xx/xx/xx parameter. The only reason grub enters into the conversation is because that's where you can change the kernel parameters, but the kernel is what would have to change.

Oh, now I see! Thanks for clarification!

Antoine wrote:

/sbin/init is a symlink to /usr/lib/systemd/systemd:

In case you installed systemd-sysvcompat package, yes.

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