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#1 2012-10-25 17:47:58

mamamia88
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Registered: 2012-08-29
Posts: 483

SSD fstab flags question

I ordered a new ssd from tigerdirect.  Well anyway hopefully it will come in today.   Apparently the wharehouse is only an hour drive from here and it shipped 2 days ago.    Anyway i was wondering do i need both relatime and noatime in fstab?   also would you reccomend a /var partition?   I'm not using one now on my hdd and it seems fine.  Total drive size is 80gb so less than that usable.   I'm thinking 15gb / 2gb swap and rest /home.

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#2 2012-10-25 17:59:16

ozar
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From: USA
Registered: 2005-02-18
Posts: 1,681

Re: SSD fstab flags question

mamamia88 wrote:

do i need both relatime and noatime in fstab?
also would you reccomend a /var partition?
I'm thinking 15gb / 2gb swap and rest /home.

I use noatime but not relatime in mine.

I don't use a /var partition.

I don't use a swap partition either, but then I do have lots of RAM.


oz

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#3 2012-10-25 18:40:55

Roken
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From: UK
Registered: 2012-01-16
Posts: 657

Re: SSD fstab flags question

You DO need to mounrt with discard to enable TRIM (if you are using ext4), or format it with discard set at formatting time, though. Just worth a mention.


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#4 2012-10-25 18:48:27

graysky
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From: /run/user/1000
Registered: 2008-12-01
Posts: 8,533
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Re: SSD fstab flags question

@OP - Refer to the SSD wiki article.  Mark thread solved.  smile


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#5 2012-10-25 18:52:00

mamamia88
Member
Registered: 2012-08-29
Posts: 483

Re: SSD fstab flags question

graysky wrote:

@OP - Refer to the SSD wiki article.  Mark thread solved.  smile

i did refer to the ssd article.  that's why i asked.    i know that i have to add discard and noatime to the /etc/fstab file i'm just curious if it's safe to remove the relatime option afterwards which the article doesn't mention.    also should i edit the fstab during the install after generating fstab or should i wait until the system is up and running before editing?

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#6 2012-10-25 18:56:29

graysky
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From: /run/user/1000
Registered: 2008-12-01
Posts: 8,533
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Re: SSD fstab flags question

You can edit it whenever.  See this for relatime/atime diffs.
http://linux.koolsolutions.com/2009/01/ … t-options/


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#7 2012-10-25 19:33:24

mamamia88
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Registered: 2012-08-29
Posts: 483

Re: SSD fstab flags question

not sure i quite understand this line 3. relatime – A filesystem mount with this option causes the access time to be updated if they are (before the update has occurred) earlier than the modification time. This significantly cuts down the writes caused by atime updates. anyone care to explain this?

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#8 2012-10-25 19:37:24

2ManyDogs
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Registered: 2012-01-15
Posts: 1,670

Re: SSD fstab flags question

From the fstab wiki entry:

atime options

The use of noatime, nodiratime or relatime can improve drive performance. Linux by default uses atime, which keeps a record (writes to the drive) every time it reads anything. This is more purposeful when Linux is used for servers; it doesn't have much value for desktop use. The worst thing about the default atime option is that even reading a file from the page cache (reading from memory instead of the drive) will still result in a write! Using the noatime option fully disables writing file access times to the drive every time you read a file. This works well for almost all applications, except for a rare few like Mutt that need the such information. For mutt, you should only use the relatime option. Using the relatime option enables the writing of file access times only when the file is being modified (unlike noatime where the file access time will never be changed and will be older than the modification time). The nodiratime option disables the writing of file access times only for directories while other files still get access times written. The best compromise might be the use of relatime in which case programs like Mutt will continue to work, but you'll still have a performance boost because files will not get access times updated unless they are modified.

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#9 2012-10-25 19:46:12

mamamia88
Member
Registered: 2012-08-29
Posts: 483

Re: SSD fstab flags question

2ManyDogs wrote:

From the fstab wiki entry:

atime options

The use of noatime, nodiratime or relatime can improve drive performance. Linux by default uses atime, which keeps a record (writes to the drive) every time it reads anything. This is more purposeful when Linux is used for servers; it doesn't have much value for desktop use. The worst thing about the default atime option is that even reading a file from the page cache (reading from memory instead of the drive) will still result in a write! Using the noatime option fully disables writing file access times to the drive every time you read a file. This works well for almost all applications, except for a rare few like Mutt that need the such information. For mutt, you should only use the relatime option. Using the relatime option enables the writing of file access times only when the file is being modified (unlike noatime where the file access time will never be changed and will be older than the modification time). The nodiratime option disables the writing of file access times only for directories while other files still get access times written. The best compromise might be the use of relatime in which case programs like Mutt will continue to work, but you'll still have a performance boost because files will not get access times updated unless they are modified.

alright thanks for that.  looks like noatime is the best and if it doesn't work out i'll just switch back.    seems simple enough

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