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#1 2003-01-20 02:01:32

deepfreeze
Member
From: NJ
Registered: 2002-12-27
Posts: 86

samba questions

Okay...I'm trying to get samba running on arch (or for that matter, getting it to run at all as this is my first experience with samba).  I have downloaded and installed the package, and found/configured smb.conf (the one in /etc/samba).  I cannot, however, seem to find any way to start the samba daemon either from CLI or from bootup.  Any help for this very elementary newb question would be appreciated!


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#2 2003-01-20 02:18:42

sarah31
Member
From: Middle of Canada
Registered: 2002-08-20
Posts: 2,975
Website

Re: samba questions

as root:

/etc/rc.d/sambad start

doesn't work (i have no idea of what the daemon name is so excuse me if i am wrong on that)?


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#3 2003-01-20 03:26:13

BluPhoenyx
Member
Registered: 2002-12-23
Posts: 239

Re: samba questions

On other distros, the file is /etc/rc.d/smb. You should be able to add this to the file /etc/rc.conf in the daemons section for auto-loading. I haven't tried this with AL since I rarely need to serve files to Windows systems. The daemons line should look something like this.

DAEMONS=(network inetd ipfm crond gpm sshd smb nfslock nfsd nfsmount)

Note: you can safely ignore the nfs* entries unless you need nfs access.

You don't mention what you require Samba for. For example, is it for printer sharing or for sharing the files on your Linux system with Windows computers? To access Windows shares from within Linux uses different methods.


BluPhoenyx

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#4 2003-01-20 08:53:51

ody
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From: Manchester, UK
Registered: 2002-08-12
Posts: 212
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Re: samba questions

/etc/rc.d/smb start

will start it

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#5 2003-01-20 22:44:22

deepfreeze
Member
From: NJ
Registered: 2002-12-27
Posts: 86

Re: samba questions

thanks! I figured it out last night but it was so late I couldn't post till now.  Thanks for all the help and advice...it's nice to be in an environment where newbs like me aren't treated with flames but with honest help and advice smile

BTW BluPhoenyx I need samba because I have a zip disk with some old excel files that I need to get to and the only zip drive I have is on my arch box. Yes, I know I could just take the drive out and put it in the windows box, but really, that's a) too much like work and b) would rob me of the chance to learn samba big_smile


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#6 2003-01-21 00:28:27

BluPhoenyx
Member
Registered: 2002-12-23
Posts: 239

Re: samba questions

That's what I was curious about. ie, file serving.

Samba is a good thing to learn and very useful, especially on larger networks with Windows machines.


BluPhoenyx

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#7 2003-02-03 09:04:20

nehsa
Member
Registered: 2003-01-14
Posts: 159

Re: samba questions

I recompiled my kernel and saw an option for samba support, then there is also a package, do I need to have both? 

Does anyone have a simple smb.conf file they could post?  The default one is huge and is way to complicated for what I need.  I don't care about security, it just needs to allow my computer to see all shared drivers and printers on a workgroup.

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#8 2003-02-04 02:29:07

BluPhoenyx
Member
Registered: 2002-12-23
Posts: 239

Re: samba questions

It's been a while since I've used Samba itself. The Samba package and the kernel support are not the same thing. Well, not exactly. The kernel support is for the mounting of file systems. The Samba package is a group of utilities, including a server which can be used to access Windows shares on a certain machine.

You will need to read some more documentation for a better understanding of all this. This includes the info inside the default smb.conf file which should specify what the different items do. Whether or not you care about security, you still need to have some understanding of it and other network principles to properly use this package and specifically regarding Windows shares.

However, for the impatient, there are GUI based setup programs which used to be available. You can google to find these as I've forgotten the names.

Since it seems you really want to access external Windows shares, you might be better off trying other options. For example, LinNeighborhood is very useful for mounting Windows file shares and the Cups printing system can use Windows shared printers. Also, the KDE desktop can be configured for this if desired. Likewise, Gnome's Nautilus browser can also access Windows shares.


BluPhoenyx

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