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#1 2006-11-30 16:19:43

dienadel
Member
From: Basque Country (Spain)
Registered: 2005-12-23
Posts: 179

Using two kernels

Hi!

I'd like to prove the kernel26ck. I use the vanilla one, But don't want to remove it. what i want is adding a new entry in menu.lst so, every "power on" of the PC i'd may choose what kernel start with.

In that situation, i make myself two questions:

1- Does the instalation of "ck kernel" overwrite the vmlinuz, etc,  that are generated and placed in /boot during the instalation of the vanilla kernel?

2- Would be the nvidia binary driver installation valid for both kernels?

Thnaks in advance!!

dienadel


Dienadel

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#2 2006-11-30 16:34:51

Sigi
Member
From: Thurgau, Switzerland
Registered: 2005-09-22
Posts: 1,121

Re: Using two kernels

1. The ck-kernel creates it's own kernel26ck.img in /boot.
2. You'll have to install all the kernel modules you need for both kernels.


Dammit, haven't been here in a while. Still rocking Arch. smile

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#3 2006-11-30 16:36:15

Acid7711
Member
From: Chicago, IL
Registered: 2006-08-18
Posts: 300
Website

Re: Using two kernels

No, you wouldn't loose anything. When using another non-vanilla kernel this is what happens, lets use ck for example.

1-vmlinuz26 changes to vmlinuz26ck
2-kernel26.img changes to kernel26ck.img (and fallback odviously smile )

The nvidia driver will only be valid for the currently running kernel. You'll need to get the one that was made for using that particular kernels source (excuse me if I'm mis termed, I'm very used to compiling kernel from source and nvidia from that same source) ie: nvidia-ck instead of nvidia for the ck source patchset.

Hope this helps smile

edit* damn I was beat again! lol.

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#4 2006-11-30 16:56:28

dienadel
Member
From: Basque Country (Spain)
Registered: 2005-12-23
Posts: 179

Re: Using two kernels

Thanks both, that was what i suposed.

Related to the nvidia, is the first time that i see the nvidia-ck package. Good.

thanks again!

dienadel


Dienadel

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#5 2006-11-30 20:57:05

broch
Banned
From: L.A. California
Registered: 2006-11-13
Posts: 975

Re: Using two kernels

actually, getting default nvidia driver may be better for multikernel setup

you will have to use -K flag. This allows to install nvidia driver for any number of kernels (I have three, all with working nvidia 3D),

Now drawback is that -K flag works only with one nvidia driver per system. So upgrading/changing driver will delete modules from all kernels (so you can't have nvidia and nvidia-ck at the same time)

assuming that you have installed default nvidia 9629 in your 2.6.18.3

now boot to -kernel26ck
and run from terminal (init 3)
sh NVIDIA-Linux-x86-1.0-9629-pkg1.run -K -q

(-q flag suppress questions installing driver with default parameters)

above will install driver for a new kernel without removing it from old kernel
Now you can boot to both kernels and in both cases driver will work.

remember that this is -K not -k
-k is used for instllation of the driver on not running kernel (with obvious restrictions)

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#6 2006-12-01 00:05:36

Acid7711
Member
From: Chicago, IL
Registered: 2006-08-18
Posts: 300
Website

Re: Using two kernels

Another thing to think about is, why do you need to switch between different kernels? It's good to keep a backup, but once I find one that's stable as the ground under my feet that works and doesn't cause me headaches, I'm not prone to sit and switch between others.


Besides, if you're going to use the ck patchset and use the nvidia-ck drivers, then if you reboot into your vanilla kernel without the nvidia vanilla kernel drivers the only thing you're going to lack is X. It's not that hard to install the correct ones from bash in case you need em.

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#7 2006-12-01 01:14:11

broch
Banned
From: L.A. California
Registered: 2006-11-13
Posts: 975

Re: Using two kernels

Another thing to think about is, why do you need to switch between different kernels?

for me that is easy to answer:
2.6.19 is better for laptops (libata/ACPI)
but I need 2.6.18 because at work I am using cisco vpn and cisco client will not compile under 2.6.19 (while it compiles under 2.6.18 or less)
I also have third kernel - "unstable" where I test different options so I would know what is beneficial and what not really.
last is fallback.

As you see there is sane explanation for having at least two kernels. But if you don't need more than one then nvidia is not a problem.

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#8 2006-12-01 02:31:20

Acid7711
Member
From: Chicago, IL
Registered: 2006-08-18
Posts: 300
Website

Re: Using two kernels

Gotcha smile Just thought maybe you were testing one for stability or something.

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#9 2006-12-01 15:23:21

brain0
Developer
From: Aachen - Germany
Registered: 2005-01-03
Posts: 1,382

Re: Using two kernels

broch wrote:

actually, getting default nvidia driver may be better for multikernel setup

No, it isn't better. Using nvidia installer instead of our packages will confuse pacman. We create an nvidia package for all our distro kernels, so you will have no problems, they will automatically be updated with the kernel update and so on.
Again: Don't use the nvidia installer!

@dienadel: As a developer, I sometimes have to compile modules for all Archlinux kernels. Thus I have kernel26, kernel26ck, kernel26beyond, kernel26suspend2 and kernel26mm installed in parallel, sometimes even another testingkernel.

@broch: Screw Cisco, try vpnc.

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#10 2006-12-01 21:27:31

broch
Banned
From: L.A. California
Registered: 2006-11-13
Posts: 975

Re: Using two kernels

We create an nvidia package for all our distro kernels, so you will have no problems, they will automatically be updated with the kernel update and so on.

yest, but this works for one kernel at a time, so either I will have to change nvidia/nv depending on which kernel I am using or re-install driver for the kernel I am booting

@broch: Screw Cisco, try vpnc.

Thanks, I will try it.

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