You are not logged in.

#1 2006-12-03 05:51:11

dummyc
Member
Registered: 2006-03-07
Posts: 15

Arch partitions

I have 40 Gig HDD. What are the default partition sizes if You go automatic install?
/boot 32Meg
/home ?
/  ?
Andrey Thanks for help

Offline

#2 2006-12-03 05:53:56

dummyc
Member
Registered: 2006-03-07
Posts: 15

Re: Arch partitions

Sorry I have 1 Gig of memory. What would be the best swap size?
Andrey

Offline

#3 2006-12-03 06:19:19

lilsirecho
Veteran
Registered: 2003-10-24
Posts: 5,000

Re: Arch partitions

My swap size in automatic 0.7.2 arch is 235MB.  I have 3GB of memory.

I have studied the use of swap in a live DVD dual-layer Larch live cd/dvd script program in USER CONTRIBUTIONS.

My study included copy to ram in excess of 3GB. in fact 25 to 30 GB of extended swap using a full HDD for swap.

See my posts in Arch Discussion.

Your request is answered with the first line of this post.

Best to you for the holidays!


Sign of the times: Navajo blanket..made in China
Hard work does not kill people but why risk it: Charlie Mccarthy
A man is not complete until he is married..then..he is finished.
When ALL is lost, what can be found? Even bytes get lonely for a little bit!     X-ray confirms Iam spineless!

Offline

#4 2006-12-03 10:10:31

FUBAR
Member
From: Belgium
Registered: 2004-12-08
Posts: 1,029
Website

Re: Arch partitions

It's maybe better to add a seperate /tmp and /var partition of around 1GB each aswell. To prevent your / from filling up by logfiles. Although this probably won't happen on a desktop system.

If you're not sure about partition sizes, you can always give LVM a try. Create a regular (non LVM) / partition of 1 GB and then use "logical volumes" for /home, /tmp, /var, /opt, /usr. LVM allows you to resize your partitions without data loss so you can shift free space from a partition you made too big to one that's in need of extra MB's. Don't use JFS on LVM though: JFS partitions can only be increased in size, not decreased. [edit]I just read XFS can't be reduced either, which puts me in quite the pickle.[/edit]

The reason for a non-LVM / is recovery: if your system is screwed up, it's easier to have a regular root containing the directories /bin, /sbin, /etc and /root for maintenance. Although on my server I put / on LVM aswell, as most rescue CD's nowadays have LVM-support ouf of the box.

Regarding the swap file, 1 GB is probably more than enough: I have 1GB in my desktop and my laptop both running Arch and I've never seen more than 200MB of swap being used. If you're running 4 or 5 fully featured (GUI wise) virtual machines at the same time you might get close to it.

If you don't want LVM (yet wink), I'd use the following:
/dev/hda1 = 1GB = swap (always make your first partition swap)
/dev/hda2 = 10GB = /
/dev/hda3 = the rest = /home

A seperate /boot isn't needed anymore.


A bus station is where a bus stops.
A train station is where a train stops.
On my desk I have a workstation.

Offline

#5 2006-12-03 12:19:59

chrismortimore
Member
From: Edinburgh, UK
Registered: 2006-07-15
Posts: 655

Re: Arch partitions

A thread regarding swap size is here: http://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php? … highlight=


Desktop: AMD Athlon64 3800+ Venice Core, 2GB PC3200, 2x160GB Maxtor DiamondMax 10, 2x320GB WD Caviar RE, Nvidia 6600GT 256MB
Laptop: Intel Pentium M, 512MB PC2700, 60GB IBM TravelStar, Nvidia 5200Go 64MB

Offline

#6 2006-12-03 12:30:54

T-Dawg
Forum Fellow
From: Wilmington, NC
Registered: 2005-01-29
Posts: 2,734

Re: Arch partitions

dummyc wrote:

I have 40 Gig HDD. What are the default partition sizes if You go automatic install?
/boot 32Meg
/home ?
/  ?
Andrey Thanks for help

I would also consider one for /var. This directory can potentally fill up quite a bit given its dynamicly expanding nature. Its were pacman keeps all its source files and packages. Minus /var and /home, your rootfs shouldn't grow any larger than 5-10gigs.

Offline

#7 2006-12-03 20:22:23

chrismortimore
Member
From: Edinburgh, UK
Registered: 2006-07-15
Posts: 655

Re: Arch partitions

I'd recommend separate /usr/local/ if you plan on installing lots of stuff (particularly games) by hand.  For starters, it stops giant things like UT2004 and Vegastrike eating your / partition, and it also means that if you need a reinstall, you can keep all of your self-installed packages just by remounting /usr/local/ (assuming your hard drive isn't knackered). 

I also use a separate /var/local/ for my PKGBUILDs.


Desktop: AMD Athlon64 3800+ Venice Core, 2GB PC3200, 2x160GB Maxtor DiamondMax 10, 2x320GB WD Caviar RE, Nvidia 6600GT 256MB
Laptop: Intel Pentium M, 512MB PC2700, 60GB IBM TravelStar, Nvidia 5200Go 64MB

Offline

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB