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#1 2002-10-04 13:41:29

dunbar
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From: Central New Hampshire USA
Registered: 2002-08-14
Posts: 106
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not found??

I'm in a directory where a certain package.tar.gz resides (which directory happens to be /mnt/cd/arch/pkg).
I'm logged in as root (not su up through a user).
I use the pacman list option (list is a suffix to the Query operation: pacman -Ql foo).
Issuing

ls package.tar.gz

shows the package is in the directory. I have already installed the package (pacman -Av package.tar.gz) and there were no errors from the installation.
I get 'not found' errors when I issue

pacman -Ql package.tar.gz

and also the same error when I issue

pacman -Ql ./package.tar.gz

(adding the ./). I also tried a few other pacman options and got the same error messages.

Stated explicitly:pacman -Av package.tar.gz works,
pacman -Ql package.tar.gz does not work. I'm trying to get comfortable with pacman and I assumed this option was the proper pacman way of getting such a list of files. I know I could probably treat the file as a .gz, unzip it and blah blah blah and all that, but I'd rather know about pacman -Ql function.

The syntax in the manpage seems to me to be vague regarding the object of the list function. What will get listed - the package.tar.gz file contents or the list of installed files? Either way, I get the error.

:?:

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#2 2002-10-04 14:13:45

sarah31
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From: Middle of Canada
Registered: 2002-08-20
Posts: 2,975
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Re: not found??

What were you trying to find out? Where the package is or just if it is in stalled?


AKA uknowme

I am not your friend

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#3 2002-10-04 17:54:50

dunbar
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From: Central New Hampshire USA
Registered: 2002-08-14
Posts: 106
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Re: not found??

Well, how can I explain this? I'm in a troubleshooting frame of mind.... I've been a career electronic technician for over 25 years, dogged, methodical research means a lot to me.

Files within 'package.tar.gz' get put somewhere; something (pacman) has to read instructions of which file goes where. I'm thinking that pacman -Ql is going to tell me which file is supposed to go where. As in, 'before it actually gets installed' I can see where files will be put. Reading the instructions from within package.tar.gz, and outputting a listing of destinations.

Mandrake has a GUI tool (rpmdrake?) which allows me to (graphically) see an RPMs intended structures of files and directories. From that kind of information, I would see that certain files went into /bin, certain files into /usr/share, and so forth.

That is what I wanted from pacman -Ql .

What will get listed - the package.tar.gz file contents or the list of installed files?

Maybe pacman -Ql can do both????

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#4 2002-10-04 18:34:56

apeiro
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From: Victoria, BC, Canada
Registered: 2002-08-12
Posts: 771
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Re: not found??

When using pacman -A, you should pass pacman a filename, such as apache-1.3.26-2.pkg.tar.gz.

When using -Q, you should pass pacman a package name, such as apache.  The only time you use a filename with -Q is if you are also using the -p switch.

Sorry for the confusion.

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#5 2002-10-04 22:11:17

sarah31
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From: Middle of Canada
Registered: 2002-08-20
Posts: 2,975
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Re: not found??

dunbar wrote:

Well, how can I explain this? I'm in a troubleshooting frame of mind.... I've been a career electronic technician for over 25 years, dogged, methodical research means a lot to me.

Files within 'package.tar.gz' get put somewhere; something (pacman) has to read instructions of which file goes where. I'm thinking that pacman -Ql is going to tell me which file is supposed to go where. As in, 'before it actually gets installed' I can see where files will be put. Reading the instructions from within package.tar.gz, and outputting a listing of destinations.

Mandrake has a GUI tool (rpmdrake?) which allows me to (graphically) see an RPMs intended structures of files and directories. From that kind of information, I would see that certain files went into /bin, certain files into /usr/share, and so forth.

That is what I wanted from pacman -Ql .

What will get listed - the package.tar.gz file contents or the list of installed files?

Maybe pacman -Ql can do both????

why not use emelfm or gentoo to browse into the .tar.gz? works for me.


AKA uknowme

I am not your friend

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#6 2002-10-04 23:25:22

dunbar
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From: Central New Hampshire USA
Registered: 2002-08-14
Posts: 106
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Re: not found??

sarah31 wrote:

why not use emelfm or gentoo to browse into the .tar.gz? works for me.

:shock: Because I'm a stubborn Irish/Scotsman.

Actually because of a purist angle: I'm likely not going to bring in other packages, foreign stuff, so if Arch is going to work for me as a distro, the individual components must be understood and must individually work properly. Good learning experience also, since I know goose-egg about CLI stuff (thanks for the lobotomy, Mandrake).

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#7 2002-10-04 23:47:57

dunbar
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From: Central New Hampshire USA
Registered: 2002-08-14
Posts: 106
Website

Re: not found??

apeiro wrote:

When using pacman -A, you should pass pacman a filename, such as apache-1.3.26-2.pkg.tar.gz.

When using -Q, you should pass pacman a package name, such as apache.  The only time you use a filename with -Q is if you are also using the -p switch.

Sorry for the confusion.

I re-read the man page for pacman (Arch 0.3, no upgrades beyond the ISOs packages) and it implies that -p, -i, and -l are at the same level of hierarchy; the man page only suggests that -i and -l work best with -p but the man page does not state the -p is required. I learned this:pacman -Qpl will list the contents of a package file where pacman -Ql does not find the package file;
pacman -Qpi will give information about the contents of the package file where pacman -Qi does not find the package file.Seems that the only way for i and l to work is after p, thus the hierarchy in the manpage is misarranged.
IMO, the man page needs to state the the -i and -l functions must be preceded by p since they do not work otherwise.... I think that's what you meant, but your explanation wasn't as explicit. I'm not trying to be a jerk or showoff, just showing any future searches the circumstances that exist at present.

[EDIT] read further, the -p option is necessary. [/EDIT]

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#8 2002-10-05 03:36:23

apeiro
Daddy
From: Victoria, BC, Canada
Registered: 2002-08-12
Posts: 771
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Re: not found??

dunbar wrote:

IMO, the man page needs to state the the -i and -l functions must be preceded by p since they do not work otherwise....

Well, they do work otherwise, but only with already installed packages.  They were initially made to query installed packages, and by name only.  You were trying to query a package file, which is where the -p switch comes in - it tells pacman to not look in the database, but instead find a file matching the arguments passed on the commandline.  No -p switch implies that pacman should be searching the installed packages database.

eg: pacman -Ql gdbm will list all the files from the installed package gdbm.  If you had a gdbm-1.8.1-2.pkg.tar.gz file in your cwd and you wanted to see the files in it, you could run pacman -Qlp gdbm-1.8.1-2.pkg.tar.gz.

Make sense?

The manpage could obviously still use some attention though.  If you can clarify my geek-coder ramblings, please do send me your changes and I can put them out with the next pacman release.

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#9 2002-10-07 11:22:31

dunbar
Member
From: Central New Hampshire USA
Registered: 2002-08-14
Posts: 106
Website

Re: not found??

Hm, ok, I think I get the gist of it; let me stew on this a while.
[edit]I'll drop ideas to you via PM, so as to not overly trash the thread.[/edit]

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